Title: Faculty & research interests

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Lei  Ding
Lei Ding, PhD
Assistant Professor of Rehabilitation & Regenerative Medicine
Assistant Professor of Microbiology & Immunology

Full Member

Department: Rehabilitation and Regenerative Medicine
Microbiology and Immunology
Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center

P&S 7513
212-305-7468
ld2567@columbia.edu


Disease Models: Hematological Diseases, Transplantation

Stem Cell Categories: Adult stem cells, Cancer stem cells

Model Organisms: Rodent

Themes: Blood, Stem Cell Biology

Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) play critical roles in the generation, repair and homeostasis of the blood and immune system via self-renewal and multilineage differentiation. They are maintained throughout life through self-renewing divisions where HSCs divide to produces HSC daughter cells. How self-renewal is regulated is a central question in stem cell biology. HSC self-renewal is regulated by both HSC intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms. In vivo, HSCs reside in a complex microenvironment and are critically regulated by factors secreted by cells that comprise a specialized niche. The HSC niche represents a critical component responsible for the extrinsic regulation of HSC self-renewal. Alterations to the microenvironment can contribute to the development of leukemia, bone marrow failure syndromes and anemia. We are investigating mechanisms, especially extrinsic mechanisms that regulate HSC self-renewal, and how mis-regulation of niche/HSC interactions contributes to diseases such as cancer and anemia. Understanding the HSC niche is a key to help us design better strategies for in vitro expansion of HSCs for clinical use and to treat niche related diseases such as leukemia and anemia.



Publications:

Ding, L., and Morrison, S
Haematopoietic stem cells and early lymphoid progenitors occupy distinct bone marrow niches. Nature. 495:231-5. (2013)

Ding, L., Saunders, T., Enikolopov, G., and Morrison, S.
Endothelial and perivascular cells maintain haematopoietic stem cells. Nature 481:457-62. (2012)

Ding, L. and Han, M.
GW182 family proteins are critical for miRNA-mediated gene silencing. Trends in Cell Biology. 17:411-6. (2007)

Zhang, L. *, Ding, L.*, Cheung, T., Dong, M., Chen, J., Sewell, A., Liu, X., Yates, J. and Han, M. (*, equal contribution)
Systematic identification of miRISC proteins, miRNAs, and their mRNA targets in C. elegans by their interactions with GW182 family proteins AIN-1 and AIN-2. Molecular Cell. 28, :598-613. (2007)

Ding, L., Spencer, A., Morita, K. and Han, M.
The developmental timing regulator AIN-1 interacts with argonaute protein ALG-1, miRISCs and may target ALG-1 to cytoplasmic P bodies in C. elegans. Molecular Cell. 19:437-447. (2005)

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