Title: Faculty & research interests

QUICK FIND




ADVANCED SEARCH



ALPHABETICAL
LIST OF MEMBERS

FACULTY PROFILE

Ellen  Ezratty
Ellen Ezratty, PhD
Assistant Professor
Full Member

Department: Pathology and Cell Biology

P&S 14-511
212-342-1776
ej2001@columbia.edu


Disease Models: Skin Diseases, Congenital Disorders

Stem Cell Categories: Adult stem cells, Tissue progenitors

Model Organisms: Human, Rodent

Themes: Skin

One fundamental question in stem cell (SC) biology is how an individual cell senses its microenvironment to transmit extracellular signals that instruct a differentiation program, maintain tissue homeostasis or promote regeneration after injury. The primary cilium has emerged as a candidate for such sensory function: this microtubule-based cellular “antenna” can send and receive extracellular cues, co-ordinate signal transduction pathways, and influence cell-cycle progression. My laboratory will utilize the skin as a model system to study these processes, since it’s a highly regenerative tissue that contains at least two different populations of resident SCs that are ciliated. In vivo RNAi studies in mice have revealed that primary cilia play at least two temporally and spatially distinct roles in balancing growth and differentiation during skin development: a novel, early role in epidermis, whose morphogenesis relies upon Notch signaling; and a later role in hair follicles, reliant upon Sonic Hedgehog signaling. Investigating ciliary-mediated SC signaling in this model system will expand our understanding of epithelial SCs and likely contribute important information for the development of SCs used for tissue repair in regenerative medicine.



Publications:

Ezratty EJ, Stokes N, Chai S, Shah AS, Williams SE, Fuchs E
A role for Primary Cilia in Notch Signaling and Epidermal Differentiation During Development Cell 145 (7):1129-41. (2011)

bottom rounded